Traumatic Brain Injury – Facts

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a significant source of disability and death in the USA.

TBIs contribute to approximately 30 percent of all deaths. Each and every single day, 153 men and women in the USA die from accidents which have TBI. People who live a TBI can confront effects that last a couple of days, or even the remainder of their lives. Outcomes of TBI can consist of impaired memory or thinking, motion, feeling (e.g., eyesight or hearing loss), or psychological functioning (e.g., personality changes, depression). These problems not only affect people but may have lasting consequences on communities and families.

What’s a TBI?
A TBI is brought on by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head that interrupts the normal use of the brain. Not all blows or jolts into the mind bring about a TBI. The severity of a TBI may vary from „moderate” (i.e., a brief change in mental status or comprehension) into „acute” (i.e., an elongated period of unconsciousness or memory loss following the accident). Many TBIs that happen annually are light, commonly referred to as concussions.

How large is your problem?
In 2013,1 roughly 2.8 million TBI-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations, and deaths happened in the USA.
TBI led to the deaths of almost 50,000 individuals.
TBI has been a diagnosis in over 282,000 hospitalizations and 2.5 million ED visits. These consisted of TBI independently or TBI in conjunction with other accidents.

During the course of six years (2007–2013), while prices of TBI-related ED visits rose by 47 percent, hospitalization rates decreased by 2.5 percent and death rates decreased by 5 percent.
In 2012, an estimated 329,290 kids (age 19 or younger) were treated at U.S. EDs for athletics and recreation-related accidents that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI.

By 2001 to 2012, the rate of ED visits to sports and recreation-related accidents with a diagnosis of concussion or TBI, independently or in conjunction with other harms, more than doubled among children (age 19 or older).

Which are the major causes of TBI?
In 2013,1 falls were the leading cause of TBI. Falls accounted for 47 percent of TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths from the USA. Falls impact the youngest and oldest age classes:
Over half (54 percent) of TBI-related ED visits hospitalizations, and deaths among children 0 to 14 years have been due to drops.
Almost 4 5 (79 percent) TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths in adults aged 65 and older have been due to drops.
Being struck by or against an item was the second top cause of TBI, accounting for approximately 15 percent of TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths from america in 2013.
More than 1 in 5 (22 percent) TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths in children less than 15 decades old were due to being struck by or against the item.
Among all age groups, automobile crashes were the third largest biggest top cause of TBI-related ED visits, hospitalizations, and deaths (14 percent). When looking at only TBI-related deaths, automobile crashes were the next top cause (19 percent) in 2013.
Intentional self-harm has been the next top reason for TBI-related deaths (33 percent) in 2013.

Risk factors for TBI
One of TBI-related deaths in 2013
prices were highest for persons 75 decades old and older.
The top cause of TBI-related death varied by age.
Falls are the leading cause of death for men 65 decades old or older.
Intentional self-harm has been the top cause of death for persons 25-64 decades old.
Automobile crashes were the leading cause of death for men 5-24 decades old.
Assaults were the chief cause of death for children ages 0-4 decades.

One of the TBI-related accidents in 2013
Hospitalization rates were greatest among men 75 decades old and older.
Rates of ED visits were greatest for persons 75 decades old and older and children 0-4 decades old.
Falls were the leading cause of TBI-related ED visits for all but one age category.
Being struck by or against an item was the top cause of TBI-related ED visits for men 15 to 24 decades old.
The Primary Cause of TBI-related hospitalizations diverse by age:
Falls are the leading cause among children 0-14 decades old and adults 45 decades old and older.
Automobile crashes were the leading cause of hospitalizations for teens and persons 15-44 decades old.

Reference: cdc.gov

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