Coding for Traumatic Brain Injury

A concussion results in a blow to the head intense enough to create a prolonged or transient adjustment of awareness, which might be accompanied by amnesia, vertigo, nausea, and pulse. The concussion may impact reflexes, judgment, memory, address, balance, and coordination. Concussions do not require a loss of awareness.

Coding for Traumatic Brain Injury

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when a sudden trauma causes damage to the brain as a consequence of the head hitting an item or vice versa.

TBI without specification is categorized Intracranial injury of other and unspecified nature, to some code from ICD-9-CM class 854. The digit describes if a open wound is mentioned by the injury.

When the TBI is recorded only as a closed head injury without additional description, then assign code 959.01. A closed head injury occurs when someone receives a blow to the head from hitting against an item, but the skull didn’t split. But when there was a lack of consciousness in the instance of a closed head injury or a TBI, assign a code from group 850, Concussion, rather than 959.01 or a code from group 854.

In case a TBI or a head injury comprised additional harms a defined signal Ought to Be delegated as follows:

• Category 851

852, Subarachnoid, subdural, and extradural hemorrhage or

Other and unspecified intracranial hemorrhage following injury, • Category 853.

There is A fifth digit subclassification Needed to Detect the length of time, and also lack of awareness, if any :

• 0, unspecified state of consciousness

• 1, without the loss of awareness;

• two, with short (less than 1 hour) loss of consciousness

• 3, with average (one to 24 hours) loss of consciousness

• 4, with prolonged (greater than 24 hours) loss of consciousness and return to preexisting awake level;

• 5, with prolonged (over 24 hours) loss of consciousness without return to pre requisite conscious level. (Use this fifth digit to designate when a patient is unconscious and expires before recovering consciousness, irrespective of the length of the lack of awareness.) ;

• 6, together with lack of consciousness of unspecified length; and

• 9, with concussion, unspecified.

Concussion
A concussion results in a blow to the head intense enough to create a prolonged or transient adjustment of awareness, which might be accompanied by amnesia, vertigo, nausea, and pulse. The concussion may impact reflexes, judgment, memory, address, balance, and coordination. Concussions do not require a loss of awareness.

Concussion is categorized to class 850. The digit will determine the duration of time, and also lack of awareness, if any. It’s classified to groups 851 into 853 In case the concussion is defined as hemorrhage, laceration, or a contusion. A code from class 850 isn’t assigned using a code from classes 851 into 853. Category 854 is utilized while the brain injury isn’t classifiable to groups 850 to 853. As a concussion is categorized into the code in class 850 A head injury described. „When the mind injury is defined as concussion, a code from group 854, Intracranial injury of other and unspecified character or signal 959.01, Head injury, unspecified, is improper” (AHA Coding Clinic for ICD-9-CM, 1999, first quarter, page 10). Patients with concussions recover completely within 24 to 48 hours.

Symptoms
Indicators of a brain injury can vary based on the size of brain damage. Signs of a mild brain injury include a brief loss of awareness (couple of seconds to a couple moments ); being dazed, confused, or disoriented; aggravation; memory or concentration difficulties; nausea or loss of balance; nausea or vomiting; blurry vision; ringing in the ears; poor taste in the mouth; sensitivity to light or noise; mood changes or mood swings; feeling sad or stressed; fatigue or nausea; sleeping longer than normal or difficulty sleeping; and problem with memory, concentration, attention, or thinking.

Indicators of a moderate or severe brain injury contain the very same signs of a moderate brain injury; a much severe and chronic headache; nausea or recurrent nausea or vomiting; seizures; inability to awaken from sleep; dilation of one or both students; slurred speech; fatigue or numbness in the extremities; lack of coordination; and increased confusion, irritability, or agitation.

Diagnosis
To diagnose a TBI, the doctor assesses a patient’s ability to follow instructions regarding blinking eyes or extremities. Additionally, the doctor may purchase X-rays or even a CT scan to find out whether the TBI could be further diagnosed as a brain hemorrhage, brain hematoma, contused (bruised) brain tissue, or brain tissue swelling.

Treatment
Though little can be done to reverse the brain damage treatment is aimed at preventing additional harm. Goals of therapy include ensuring appropriate oxygen flow to the brain, keeping adequate blood circulation, and controlling blood pressure.

Some TBIs require operation to remove or fix the hemorrhage or hematoma.

Sequencing and coding for TBI are all determined by the physician documentation from the medical record and use of the Official Coding Guidelines. Also, use special AHA Coding Clinic for ICD-9-CM and American Medical Association CPT Assistant references to guarantee accurate and complete coding.

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